#1 Posted by FBM on Aug 25, 2011 3:00 PM

Also, Linux fans always say that it’s better to have a case-sensitive FS.

This makes no sense and is COMPLETE BULLSHlT. They only say that because their beloved Linux does it because it inherited it from UNIX.

This makes no sense because absolutely every human being will answer “yes” to the question “Is 'file’ the same word as 'File’?”.

The second reason it makes no sense is that FS case-sensitiveness has never been and will never be useful. There’s not a single use case where it is useful. But there are billions of occurrences of it annoying people, every kind of people. Those saying otherwise are just fanboys lying to preserve this harmful inheritance from a badly designed, 40 years old OS.

#2 Posted by hairyfeet on Sep 18, 2012 8:00 PM

This TM was practically written for Robert Pogson! I contribute to the little round table on LinuxInsider (as the sane Windows user of course) and its gotten to the point I'm just like sam kinison, going "Just say it! say it already! ARRRGH SAY IT!" because after nearly 3 YEARS on that little panel he has YET to say Microsoft, MSFT, or even MS. Its "M$", "The Other Company", its literally "they who shall not be named."

#3 Posted by kurkosdr on Sep 19, 2012 7:33 AM

The second reason it makes no sense is that FS case-sensitiveness has never been and will never be useful. There’s not a single use case where it is useful.

Case sensitivity was useful only for Ken and Dennis, because with case sensitivity, they could do sorting simply buy comparing the ASCII numbers of each letter. If they had made a simple CompareChar() function that would take into account sensitivity, he would have been spared the whole jihad. Does anyone -besides the Unix neckbeards- like the fact Askisi_1.c goes at the top of the list while askisi_2.c goes at the bottom (below files starting with W) when sorting by name?

A similar thing happened with NFS and it's "stateless-ness". It was only a win for the programers who made NFS, because not having to write code to handle state saved them time. A file has by definition a state (it's either there or it's not), so having a "stateless" NFS makes no sense, and requires gross hacks. I hate it everytime my home account gets littered with .nfs(something_crazy) files.

#4 Posted by kurkosdr on Sep 19, 2012 7:34 AM

take into account sensitivity = take into account case

#5 Posted by kurkosdr on Sep 19, 2012 7:34 AM

he would have been spared = we would have been spared

#6 Posted by DrLoser on Sep 19, 2012 7:36 AM

Umm, Kurks, that's not an issue with case sensitivity.  That's an issue with your comparator.

I happen to disagree with FBM on this one.  The real world takes case sensitivity into account.  I see no good reason why the IT world should diverge over such a fundamental issue.

#7 Posted by Linsuxoid on Sep 19, 2012 2:12 PM

I'm professionally deformed already. See, I feel some minor disgust when dealing with programming languages that have case-insensitive grammar. At the same time, I don't see ANY reason to use case-sensitive filesystems (and I've spent 2+ years on Linux BEFORE I moved to Windows).

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